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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)
think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military personnel in america. and a suicide bombing at a mosque at the capital of baghdad. explosives inside the mosque south of kirkuk. a funeral was taking place at the time of the attack. russia says it is not planning large-scale evacuation of its citizens from syria despite the crisis there. many were flown back to m
the challenge, and tried a different location this time in pakistan. smith: we just got a lot of snow, and we'll be able to track the snow leopard -- and so we'll have a lot better chance of filming it so it's just fantastic. attenborough: after that promising start things didn't go so well for mark. he and the crew spent a fruitless month trudging through the snow. mark spent all christmas in the mountains with no sign of a snow leopard, but it was a much happier new year. we just got -- we just got a report there's a snow leopard up on the ridge. we were too low where we were before so it's just trying to get some height to get a better view of it. attenborough: finally, mark was rewarded with his first ever glimpse. smith: i looked up onto the ridge i could see this leopard-shaped rock which i've seen a million times before and i looked through the binoculars and it was a leopard just sat there it was perched, like just on top of the rock, and it looked down at us and it sort of sat down in a sort of sphinx-like posture. attenborough: a few
a government. the pakistan community feels they're being unfairly punished for their beliefs following a graveyard attack. a man tied up a guard and 21 others before smashing more than 100 gravestones. >> the difference between the two halves of this one graveyard is plain to see. one side is neat and orderly, the other smashed to pieces. on december 3 at around one dozen men stormed the cemetery in the middle of the night. armed with guns, pickaxes, and sledgehammers, they set upon these graves, determined to destroy tombstones inscribed with koranic verse is. most are regarded as heretics because they believe there was a profit after muhammad. many frown on muslim prayers and epitaphs. the spokesman did not want to show his face because he feared he would be punished for speaking out. he told me the attack did not come as a complete surprise. >> they wanted us to remove all the islamic text which had been written on the tombstones. >> the discriminant -- the discrimination faced by them is unsurprising because in many ways it is mandated by the state. in 1974, pakistan was first elec
strikes in a number of countries including somalia, pakistan, afghanistan, and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the prophet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or forces are there to receive them. we take them somewhere south, to restore their sense of security
organizations in pakistan's tribal areas who have argued from their perspective on the ground, civilian casualties are rather minimal. but other than some sporadic conversations i've had with people in the tribal areas, i think the data we have publicly is limited. >> brown: what does your data show, or people you talk to show? >> two things. one is tomorrow the united nations is going to announce it's appointing a special investigator into civilian deaths by drones, and through this targeted killing program. so we should be able to get some of the real facts through this u.n. investigation. it's ridiculous that the united states itself hasn't conducted this kind of investigation. of or disclose its results. but that investigation will be done by the u.n. the second thing is general mcchrystal just earlier this month talks of talked about the drone program and how-- how th the-- the attacks on civilians and the civilian casualties are cause, what he calls a vis viseral reaction of hatred in the affected countries, the very people we're trying to win over to our side. >> brown: that's be
, climbing support for the state department. you have pakistan and afghanistan, with the drawal from afghanistan that will only make it harder, and that has impact on pakistan. china, and russia. leadership in russia, as you know, very, very complicated. where does he look first for support, and, you know, who wants this job? >> i would say the middle east -- the hard thing that you hit on is the challenges for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled
countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees, take questions, be very visible. as secretary, she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record, but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning, that this superstar, part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confir
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
of classification, but i believe the secrecy surrounding drones particularly with respect to pakistan works with to our advantage. i hope the administration finds ways to be more transparent going forward. this is a full plate for john kerry. we have known crisis dealing with syria. can we have a meaningful conversation with iran. he'll be at the forefront of creating a sustainable relationship and a working relationship with new leadership in china. he has been very involved over the years but only in pakistan issues afghanistan issues. he'll work the diplomat iic aspect of the war and he has been involved in the crisis of sudan. if the list wasn't long enough there is the emerging challenge in mali and across and of courseofcourse britain's role, he'll be looking at the concerns of the united states about britain turning inward as opposed to being a strong voice within the european union. very complex issues that he'll wrestle with over the next four years. >> jennifer: you covered my list of questions so i really appreciate that former assistant secretary of state p.j. crowley. thank you
and giving. look at pakistan. we gave pakistan $2 billion a year and said to them, here, have this money, find bin laden. what did we do? we are getting -- they were never going to find bin laden. the minute they found him they lost the two million. so the tail shouldn't be wagging the dog when it comes to foreign assistance. >> thank you very much. after the bluster, the bs, the benghazi hearing moving into a debate over security funding. >> the funds provided by congress were enat quit. >> for the past two years ago the also meteorologist's meteorologist's for diplomatic fun has been slashed. >> congress has consistently given less. >> mullins and pickerring says that money was and is in the budget is very important and makes a difference. >> i would ask this committee to work with us. there are holds on the security funding going to libya. >> but the numbers tell a very different story. funding for embassy security in the region has actually been spiking and is expected to remain high. brett, that became the best sort of defense becoming offense. it's all the republicans' fault. >> it
at the instability in pakistan. this is a real danger we have to think about in the future. if we ignore them, that is a prescription for getting more americans killed. host: i want to get your reaction to what the secretary of state had to say yes today. here's what she had to say. [video clip] guest: i think you would hear the same from the intelligence community or dod. the work that was done in afghanistan and pakistan, they have taken out a whole cadre of leadership. people have migrated back to other parts of the world who are affiliates, part of the jihad syndicate. they are extremists and have designs on overthrowing existing governments, control and territory. there has been the decimation of al qaeda in the afghanistan- pakistan region, we have to contend with the wannabes and the affiliate's going forward. host: any reaction? guest: there has been a loss of capacity on the part of al qaeda central and pakistan. because osama bin laden is dead, that doesn't mean allocate it is dead -- it does mean al qaeda is dead. they are very much alive. they have migrated. they are now seeing a
public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bauer. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific brid
's a big problem. and frankly, nobody in the u.s. is covering the problems in pakistan, which are very real. pakistan is probably building more nuclear weapons right now than any other countries in the world. we talk about an iranian bomb maybe in the the near future. i think there are whoever a hundred pakistani nuclear weapons and it's a very fragile country with very, very deep problems. afghanistan is decaying, it's not getting better. iraq is decaying, the amount of violence in iraq has gone up dramatically and syria is a mess. and bahrain has a serious problem and yemen is a mess. somalia is a mess. you start looking around and begin to realize there's a much more dangerous world out there than president obama's inaugural address or secretary clinton's testimony today would lead you to believe. >> greta: mr. speaker let me just change the topic. >> greta: i am 'm curious, who the leader of the republican party right now. >> i don't believe we have a leader, and-- >> and i'm talking about, sir, who is the, you know, who does the republican party look to right now? >> the republican par
and the mideast around pakistan and afghanistan, as you quote on your -- close on your tenure i wondered if you'd share some important lessons learned from the time you spent in this post and enlighten us as to what congress can do to help respond and get in front of these threats as we move forward and related to that, if i may, assuming that you're going to say about increased engagement at the ground level. how do we do that in areas that are unstable where we need to depend on local government or local security forces that quite frankly we've seen don't have the ability to provide the type of security that our diplomats are going to demand? see you here. i thank you for your interest in looking sort of into the future. let me just make a couple of points. first, we have a lot of tools that we don't use as well as we should. i think we've abdicated the broadcasting arena where both in tv and radio, which are considered kind of old fashioned, media are still very important in a lot of difficult places where we're trying to do business. i think we have to get our act together. i would hope thi
for islamist militants from pakistan. the assault killed more than 160 people, including six americans. headley could have gotten life in prison, but federal prosecutors in chicago asked for a more lenient sentence, citing his cooperation. the united nations opened a special investigation today into drone warfare. it will focus on civilian casualties resulting from strikes aimed at suspected terror cells. under president obama, the c.i.a. has stepped up drone attacks, especially in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, first-time claims for unemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspond
strikes in a number of countries including somalia pakistan, afghanistan and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the profiphet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or forces are there to receive them. we take them somewhere south, to restore their sense of security. this i
diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bower, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times, he's been to egypt since then, and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bower. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bent over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administrati
in afghanistan and spread to iraq and is in yemen and pakistan and other places. we tend to understand that when soldiers go to war, they die in service to our country and we're grateful that they do that. once the conflict ends, we're left with fragile states with challenging situations and poor, weak governments and that's the construct that chris stevens willingly walked into because he understood that as we see a libya or egypt or tunisia or yemen move forward, the united states has to be there. while there were mistakes made and underestimations, we can't reduce it to zero. chris stevens understood the situation in benghazi better than anyone else and decided to be there and we should be grateful for his service and his sacrifice. >> the biggest mistake was putting susan rice on that sunday morning on television with what turned out to be wrong intelligence when they didn't need to go that fast. that's probably as much the media's fault for demanding that they do that kind of thing. i think everyone is culpable here. let's take a break and we'll come back and talk about two more hot button
rather have part-time work. >> i want to -- you are new to the panel, welcome. you were born in pakistan, you lived all over the world, do you see america, the u.s. as falling behind i terms of a leadership position it may have had in the world in terms of the most advanced country for women say 20 years ago? >> i think as pakistani-american this country has opportunities for everybody. but -- and i also see women here are getting education much more than -- sometimes more than boys. the fact that women are falling behind in the workplace that has to mean that their life circumstances are such that they cannot do -- go beyond part-time work so i totally agree with the congresswoman, i think that you have to -- the government, the state has to prepare the ground for these women to achieve the maximum that they can. >> but i think another take on that is that the woman that worked in corporate america for very long time i found women in managerial positions won't hire other women. i find sometimes we're biased on each other in hiring qualified women. >> i don't agree with that. i am runnin
in public forums. she would-- when she visited countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees take questions, be very visible. as secretary she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning that this superstar part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry assuming what most
. the terribly difficult challenge dealing with and reducing the flow of calcium ammonium nitrate from pakistan into afghanistan which finds its way into the roadside bombs that kill our troops, known as ied's. thank you for the work. the work on behalf of women throughout the world but also women and girls particularly in afghanistan and even though we are still in the throes of responding to the challenges in syria, the great work you have done on humanitarian assistance and other elements of that strategy we have worked together on. i also want to commend the words he spoke today about not retreating when it comes to getting that balance right queen engagement and also security. both high priorities. i was struck by and i am glad you were so is this a bit on page 3 of your testimony about -- you were so pacific on page 3 of your testimony. the recommendation by the board which now has found its way into the jake now is a set of 64 specific action items. you said 85% are on track to be completed by the end of march. what if any impediments and implementation do you perceive right now and are
more point then have the talking stick as long as you want. >> in iran, in pakistan, in afghanistan, rape is a conscious tool of sub, the third point and one we should give real thought to is the stress on military families. we already lose a lot of officers at the major level because of the strained families. for those military spouses who are not in combat, this is one more reason to worry about the high rate of family break up that we already see among military personnel. >> david, forgive me, i think you're dead wrong on all those points. on the last, you're absolutely right. there's been a lot of strain on military families. the solution is not to deny women the opportunity to serve in combat positions, the solution is to rejigger the personal system to do a better job of making sure families do not have two parents at risk at the same time. on the issue of rape, if a woman is willing to assume the risk, just as our men in combat will assume that risk, it's not up to us to say you're not allowed. it's a risk men take, too. and on the issue of standards dropping, wow, i think it
of state hillary clinton and president obama did that joint public service announce in the pakistan. where they said please, you know, know we didn't, we weren't the cause of the video that caused the riot. we didn't make the video. >> bob: you were waiting for hillary clinton, the benghazi people that follow this closely waiting for this to be the big moment. they didn't lay a finger on her. this is over. forget it. you have want to keep it going, fine. >> eric: agree with you. >> bob: old news. >> eric: i agree 100%. i was waiting for a senator, i put it up on senator. failed. corker. failed. rubio. failed. down the line. they had her, they had her with her own words. and they for some reason went back to the review board. that said here is where the failures were. there are four dead americans. >> kimberly: rand went after her. >> eric: 84 minutes in before they went after her. >> kimberly: then rand said if i was president and you worked for me and you didn't read the cable, bye. let's play that. >> had i been president at the time and i found you did not read the cables from benghazi,
africa with al-qaeda. question marks about afghanistan. pakistan increasing the nuclear capability. it seems a more dangerous world than when secretary clinton took office. >> if john kerry was here and heard your summary he might have second thoughts about taking the job. yes, endless stream of problems. i don't know the people personally, but my understanding of the president he is a micro manager, not a delegator. george bush genuinely delegat delegated to the secretary of state. this president is micro manager even with hillary clinton. whatever john kerry does or says it's because that is what he knows or he believes that barack obama wants. personification of america minus the military force. in other countrys. in some respects insurgents are worse than assad. we know it from egypt and libya. what can we do without the military to back him up? there is a limited ability he can -- for what he can do. extend the president's will with diplomats. it doesn't matter who the secretary of state is. because they will say what barack obama wants him to say. >> bret: to the point, white
that started in afghanistan, spread to iraq, and is in yemen, pakistan, other places. we tend to understand that when soldiers go to war soldiers die in the service of our country and we're ever so grateful that they do that. but once the conflict ends, we're left with fragile states with challenging situations and poor, weak governments. and that's the construct that chris stevens willily walked into because he understood that as we see a libya or an egypt or a a tunisia or a yemen move forward the united states has to be there. and while there were mistakes made, there were underestimations the of the threat posed to that temporary diplomatic facility, at the same time we can never reduce the risk to zero. >> right. >> i think we should respect the fact that chris stevens understood the situation in benghazi better than anyone else and he was the one who ultimately decided to be there and we should be grateful for his service and his sacrifice. >> the biggest mistake was putting susan rice on that sunday morning on television with what turned out to be wrong intelligence when they didn't
. there has to be some effort. i probably still worry a little more about what's going on in pakistan and a little more about what's going on in yemen, not to mention syria, but north africa is certainly up there on the top three or four. >> but, mike, to your point, one of the things that came out of the hearings yesterday with secretary of state clinton was that america is dealing with nations whose own governments are in a shambles. and yet people like conservative chris stevens thought itthe bes way to make progress was to be there. you say we have to have relationships with these nations, but if those governments are in such a shambles, what's the alternative. how do we resolve that? >> i'm glad you raised those points. i know a lot of not only military personnel who are very brave but state department personnel who are very brave and yet when they take risks and when a benghazi consulate is overrun, we consider that fundamentally unacceptable. it is a terrible tragedy, but it is part of the risk in this world of being in places where you need to be when situations are not always
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)